Find Your Passion: 3 Quick Career Transitions

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Find Your Passion: 3 Quick Career Transitions

career transitions

Published in Revolutionary Paideia
By Antonio Maurice Daniels on March 25, 2014

Job satisfaction is a lost concept, at least according to 65 percent of workers in the U.S. and Canada who responded to a 2012 Right Management survey. Nearly half of those surveyed, or 44 percent, were completely unsatisfied with their current positions; 21 percent were somewhat unsatisfied. Only 19 percent reported overall satisfaction. If you’re in the majority that finds little to no joy on the job, it may be time to align your passions with your purpose and launch a new career.

Animal Lover

Your lifelong array of dogs, cats, rabbits and other pets may attest to your love of animals, and you can turn that love into a paycheck with a career helping animals. The demand for veterinary assistants is expected to increase by 10 percent over the next 10 years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and you can join the ranks by launching a career in the field.

Online institutions like Penn Foster offer diploma programs in veterinary studies, with the overall goal of readying you for a position as a veterinary assistant. Duties can include monitoring and caring for animals after surgery, preparing instruments and assisting with medication and emergency first aid. An American Veterinary Medical Association survey reported a well-above-average satisfaction level for vets, and their assistants may enjoy a similar level of delight.

Design Junkie

If you’re accustomed to hearing great praise when people walk into your home and see what you’ve done with the place, you may be able to extend that talent to others with a career in interior design. Interior designers are a creative lot with flexible work choices. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports about 25 percent of interior designers were self-employed in 2012, and the field is expected to grow 13 percent over the next decade.

Gaining a strong understanding of the industry goes far beyond matching up throw pillows. Buttress your innate talent and artistic eye with training in the field, which you can do in fewer than six months. You’ll then be armed with the knowledge about match lighting, colors and materials with space requirements and homeowners’ tastes. A StudentsReview survey that polled interior design majors after graduation found more than half were satisfied with their line of work.

True Crime Buff

If your nightstand is stacked with nonfiction crime novels and the first news stories you read involve court cases, a hunch says you might enjoy a career in Criminal Justice. A solid place to start is with an associate’s degree in the field, which can serve as a stepping stone into a variety of job choices.

A degree in Criminal Justice can supplement your existing knowledge of the court and corrections systems, outline how police management operates and even touch on theories of what makes people turn to crime. Top it off with basics on the nature of crime, law and Criminal Justice and you’re ready to job hunt for local, state or even federal government jobs at USAJobs.gov. While job growth in the field depends on the exact position you choose, a StudentsReview survey reported nearly 70 percent of Criminal Justice graduates were satisfied with their new jobs.


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